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Monday, 19 June 2017

Do You Know What Slows Your Employees Down?



Productivity is one of the most important issues that an organization has to deal with. But what happens if you have some of your good employees are getting slow? There is another issue that is worth bringing up here. If you have an employee that once seemed like a good candidate and now they are slow and unmotivated, try to determine why that is. Sometimes an employee may act like this if they don’t have all the tools they need to complete a task; they are not getting clear instructions, or may even have personal problems that are draining their brain. But if you can get to the bottom of it and understand where the problem is coming from, you may be able to be more effective at addressing it.


Here we are sharing reasons for the slow down of good employees.


Poor Communication between Employee and Employer

The biggest problem with any relationship is a lack of communication. Poor communication in the workplace can lead to poor relations between employees and an unfriendly work atmosphere in general that renders employees inefficient and ineffective. The issue starts when employees avoid speaking forthrightly to their manager for fear of counterblow, a valid feeling in many cases. But there are plenty of things organizations can do to open the lines of communication, like making time for employees, giving feedback, listening closely, asking questions and above all else


Lack of Appreciation at Workplace

It is a known fact that appreciation is one of the top motivators for employees to work harder and to be more committed to their companies. Employees often are full of energy and with big ideas when they start a job, but receiving little or no feedback or appreciation from the boss can make their morale down. Recognition is a key factor to boost up employees morale. Those who perform in a company must be recognized. When an employee feels unappreciated at work, the stress it creates turned into dissatisfaction about the job that affects the productivity of employee and organization both. There are several ways to display appreciation, but the simplest ones are sometimes all that’s necessary.


Favoritism

There's no question that favoritism is a bad management practice. It breeds bitterness, destroys employee morale, and creates hindrance in a good performance. Favoritism also leads to lost productivity, as employees who aren't getting the plum assignments spend more and more time gossiping and griping about how unfair the system is rather than doing their work. When “who you know” becomes a reason for advancement or preferential treatment, employees often find it tough to swallow this bitter pill.


No Opportunities for Growth

An employee’s perception of internal growth and development opportunities is one of the more important predictors of employee engagement. Opportunities for growth and development help employees expand their knowledge, skills, and abilities, and apply the competencies they have gained to new situations.  For many organizations, advancements and promotions can be likely because of struggling business operations. Employees notice the decrease in succession planning and hence the drop in delivering efficiency and productivity in an effective manner.


Overbearing Boss

A huge pile of unfinished work is not the main reason why employees become depressed; it is the work environment and the feeling of being treated unfairly by the management that has the greatest effect on an employee’s mood. A boss can be a nurturing coach interested and actively involved in the success of his team. A close employee-boss relationship can create an open line of communication that allows management to understand the staff's stand on issues, create effective forms of motivation, and create a positive and productive work environment. A boss can also be a closed-door individual who offers little positive feedback and can bring down the morale of his entire group.



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Monday, 5 June 2017

5 Reasons of Poor Communication at Workplace




Lack of communication in the workplace can occur on a large scale, such as between management and employees, individual employees and between employees and clients as well. Poor communication in the workplace can lead to poor relations between employees and create an unfriendly work atmosphere in general that renders employees inefficient and ineffective. This leads employees to reciprocate their feelings to the customers. Rather than dealing with the effects of poor communication in the organization, it is better to know the causes and deal with it. Many things can cause poor communication in the workplace. From personal conflict to low morale to lack of motivation poor communication will ensue.

 

1. Unclear Goals & Objectives

One of the most critical mistakes organizations make is not clearly defining their goals at the outset, in terms of their business model and product development goals. Well-defined goals provide a destination that team members can get behind and help to overcome obstacles and roadblocks that are encountered along the way. Organizations must clearly identify their goals at the outset because those who join your team are motivated by your vision, and your goal is the description of your ultimate destination.

 


2. Lack of information for the proper accomplishment of the tasks

In today’s information overload society, employees often lack the information they need to do their jobs.  They may have the data that they require from external suppliers, however, it is the information that their supervisors and co-workers have, but have not properly shared, that remains unsaid.  Frequently, this poor communication is a result of the fact that the people with the information are still processing it themselves, and haven’t distanced themselves enough from the problem to discover that there are other people around them who will also be requiring that information.

 


3. Poor Leadership

When leaders effectively communicate, they not only are prepared – but are mindful of their audiences’ needs to move critical issues and agendas forward. Poor leaders don’t value communication with their employees they might spend long periods of time away from his desk or office or might ignore staff emails and telephone messages. Listening to others is a low priority and a poor communicator might interrupt while an employee is talking and cut the conversation short. Poor communicators might also fail to pass along new information about company policies or procedures that will affect the way staff members perform their jobs.



4. Personal Issues

Every workplace has employees who have things going on outside of work. A tough time at home, financial problems etc. They refuse to admit they might be part of the problem. Though you encourage employees not to let personal matters interfere with their work. A distracted employee is irritable and may wrongfully communicate disrespect and lack of interest in the job. Give distracted employees some time off, where necessary and possible, to allow them to deal with a personal matter.

 


5. Cultural Diversities

Cultural problems can range from miscommunication to actual conflict, all endangering effective employees productivity and performance.  Different cultures have their own way of interpreting things, especially with nonverbal language. Organizational diversity should inspire teamwork on a global scale with each employee performing at their best. However, ineffective or lack of communication as a result of diversity in the workplace can lead to confusion of business and customer needs, low employee morale and division among employees.


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Sunday, 4 June 2017

Changing Jobs?



We have all changed jobs and will come to career crossroads in future as well. Here are the top 10 questions to ask before making a career move.


1. Am I making a mere job change? Or is it a career progression in terms of a higher designation with a higher span of control, more challenging responsibilities with larger team handling? Is it a lateral move or a next level growth move in my career?


2. What are the further growth prospects and learning opportunities in the new role and organization?


3. By choice, am I making a move to an established/new set up, local organization or an MNC? Am I moving to a growing/stable/new industry? Will this move enhance the value of my resume? Check the brand name and its value, industry type and competition, players in it, size of the organization in terms of profitability, growth rate, headcount, your own team size and industry/ business sustainability in the long run or recession-like turbulent situation.


4. Who will be my new boss/manager? What is his/her background? Who are the seniors and leaders on the management team? Are these the one I would love to work with? Their background can be viewed on professional networking sites and details can be checked from your own network or other industry professionals.


5. What are the organization's vision, mission, and values? How is the organizational culture? Does this match with your own belief and way of working? Is the organizational structure flat or does it have a long hierarchy with too many grades/bands? Where does your position stand in this structure? What are the designations used in the organization's hierarchy in each grade/band? What decision-making powers and authorities come along with the new responsibilities and designation?


6. What are the compensation and benefits offered? Is it as per the market range specified by compensation surveys and the percentile you are looking for? What are the policies and practices on employee recognition, welfare, and facilities offered?


7. What are the latest systems, software, technology and processes used in the new organization?


8. What is the location of the new organization? Does this match your location preference (if you have any proximity criteria)? Where might the new role take you with a transfer situation in future? Is an international move possible (if you have the interest to move abroad)?


9. Does the new role match your interest, aspiration, motivation and long-term career goals?


10. Are you taking a long-term calculated risk with this career progression move?



Saturday, 3 June 2017

Are You Also Dealing With Office Politics?




Office politics is simply about the differences between people at work; differences in opinions, conflicts of interests are often manifested as office politics. It all goes down to human communications and relationships. Office politics are the strategies that people use and play to gain an advantage, personally or for a cause they support. The term often has a negative connotation, in that it refers to strategies people use to seek advantage at the expense of others.


But there is no need get stressed of office politics. Below are the tips which will help you to deal with it and keep thins win-win.


1. Keep Your Eyes on the Goal

The most common reactions to politics at work are either fight or flight. Keep the big picture in mind and learn to focus on the long-term results you want instead of short-term emotions. When you get caught up emotionally, you run the risk of making decisions you’ll regret down the road.  Maintaining emotional composure in the workplace is not only widely regarded as appropriate behavior, but is also expected in the professional setting. Keeping your eyes on the goal lets you develop and maintain a strategic approach to dealing with your workplace’s unique political atmosphere.


2. Don’t Get Personal

In office politics, you’ll lose your patience and get angry with people. It happens. There will be times when you get frustrated and feel the urge to give that person a piece of your mind and teach him a lesson. Don’t, people tend to remember moments when they were humiliated or insulted. Even if you win this argument and get to feel really good about it, for now, you’ll pay the price later when you need help from this person. What goes around comes around.

Special note – If you have already gone through such unexpected situations prepare yourself in advance and start working from now on multiple options to avoid hurdles in your desired outcomes for future.


3.Listen and Observe your Surrounding Carefully

When you spend more time listening, you are less likely to say something that will come back to bite you later. Also, people like people who listen to them. Simultaneously observing the relationships between co-workers and superiors and paying attention to informal social networks is important. By observing the communication and relationships that surround you at work will help you in improving your difficult relationships and attract opportunities where you can shine.


4. Focus on your Circle of Influence

Look for people who are not necessarily in high-level roles, but who have the ability to make things happen. Who are the movers and shakers in your organization, and what can you learn from how they get things done.


5. Build Relationships

One of the smartest things you can do is to build a relationship throughout the company so that you’ll have a foot in as many of the political camps as possible. But remember, build relationships on trust and respect – avoid empty flattery. Be a part of multiple networks – this way you can keep your finger on the pulse of the organization. Be friendly with everyone but don't align yourself with one group or another specifically.


6. Neutralize Negative Play

If anyone goes into a negative swirl, ignore or give a simple reply like -"I see" or "OK". On the other hand, people being positive, reply in affirmation and enthusiasm. Get to know these people better and be courteous to them, but always be very careful what you say to them. Understand what motivates these people and what their goals are, and so learn how to avoid or counter the impact of their negative politicking.


7. Govern Your Own Behaviour

Maintain your integrity at all times and remain professional. Must avoid whining and complaining. When voicing objections or criticism, make sure you take an organizational perspective not a personal one and remember the organization's interests. Don't rely on confidentiality because for the personal sake it is hard for people to maintain, assume things will be disclosed and so decide what you should reveal accordingly. Be positive and model of integrity to your team, and discourage politics within it.


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How To Help Employees In Improving Their Work-Life Balance



In today’s competitive and hectic scenario most employees are striving for work-life balance. Modern employees demand greater control over their lives and a bigger say in the structure of their jobs.  Balanced employees tend to feel more motivated and less stressed out at work, which thereby increases company productivity and reduces the number of conflicts among co-workers and management. So how can an as organization you can help employees to achieve better work/life balance without sacrificing productivity and without busting the budget?


1.Focusing on outcomes, not hours worked

 The common notion of productivity is the ability to churn out a lot of work in a short span of time. High productivity doesn’t necessarily come from fix or 8-hour segments. Productive employees may get their work done efficiently, and not need to be at the worksite full office hours every day.


2. Allow only limited carry over of paid time off (PTO) into another calendar year

Many organizations have adopted a paid time off (PTO) program that grants employees a specified number of paid leave days that employees may use for any purpose. If the goal of paid time off is to encourage employees to do just that – take time off – paying employees for the time is counter productive. Even if employees want to contribute the value of their paid time off to a coworker or to help someone who has used his or her time up for valid reasons, these actions do not encourage the work balance and rejuvenation employees need.


3. Focusing on the image and culture that leaders projects in front of employees

If the leaders are promoting the idea of work-life balance, employees will be more encouraged to do the same and be less fearful that the culture will not support it. The actions of leaders are heard and observed by employees. When a senior manager calls in for unimportant meetings while out-of-the-office, employees get the message. It affects their personal choices for work and life balance.


4. Review your work culture and Work Requirement

It is must for organizations to practice productive work culture and identify actual work requirement. Does the culture promote overwork? Are there manageable workloads? Are there reasonable expectations? By identifying and working on these reasons you can set an example of good work culture and help your employees in work life balance.


5.Sponsor Team Building activities  and  family events for employees

Encourage team building, friendships among employees, and an inclusion of families in work events. Organizations should aware with the reality that forced team-building methods are disgusting for many employees, who might find them artificial, embarrassing, and a waste of time. Team-building activities should bolster the work employees complete together, or provide a genuine opportunity to relax and unwind.


6. Educate your employees about work/life balance

While simple, just the act of providing information about work/life balance to employees can foster a better culture. Organizations can also help employees master new tech by supporting training and workshops. This idea can result in employees taking better care to ensure this balance exists.


7. Unleash creativity and promote employee hobby clubs

If you find you will get many good singers, photographers, sports persons and creative people in your office.  When you encourage employees they will love to share their interest in various outside-of-work activities. Sports and social clubs help build employee engagement and motivation. Provide the space, email lists, and occasional financial support to promote hobbies of your employees at work.


8. Getting input from employees

Who better to consult about what employees in your office truly need than the employees themselves! Pay attention to the signs of inadequate work/life balance to see if more adjustments are needed.  If you get a sense that your employees are struggling with work-life balance, ask them what changes around the workplace might help. Also, Watch for stress and burnout.



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